Later life

Later life

When Jacob returned from a European trip with E Landseer in 1840, he was supposed to be resting to improve his health. He had suffered from a 6 week bout of quinsy (peritonsillar abscess) while they had been in Geneva. However, he threw himself into the establishment and development of the Pharmaceutical Society.

His condition (laryngeal phthisis) continued and his health declined through the 1840s and 1850s, no doubt hastened by his hard work. By the end of his life he was unable to speak, and hardly able to eat which meant that he became emaciated. He continued to write and take part in meetings and didn’t take to his bed. He died on 12 June 1859, and was interred at Tunbridge Wells cemetery in a plot that he had selected.

 

 

Image above: In 1959, the centenary of Jacob Bell's death, the Pharmaceutical Society's President, Mr Gwilym Hughes, unveiled a memorial tablet on his gravestone in Tunbridge Wells.