Revalidation

Example Revalidation records

This page provides examples of planned and unplanned CPD records to help inspire you when writing your own original records for revalidation. Some examples have been published by the GPhC.

To help you practice completing a CPD record of your own - download one of our revalidation ready CPD recording templates below. Please note, these are Word document templates - you may need to find a suitable app if downloading on a non PC/laptop.

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Reflective account CPD

Effective Communication: Patient Facing Hospital (RPS) Effective Communication: Patient Facing Hospital (RPS)

Provide a reflective account of how you met one (or more) of the GPhC’s standards for pharmacy professionals.The GPhC will tell you which standard(s) to choose from each year.

I am a pharmacist working in a Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), which oversees the implementation of local prescribing formularies in line with my STP footprint.I am also the Education and Training lead for our CCG which means I champion the development of our 10 pharmacists.

My service users are the pharmacists within my project team and also the 10 pharmacists who rely on me for their Education and Training opportunities.

(Who, what, and why)

Part of my role is to ensure that the Education and Training budget for our team is appropriately managed. I will liaise with our team to identify their learning needs for the following 12 months and find learning opportunities that meet these needs.

It was approaching the end of our financial year and I could see that a number of our team had not organised any personal development opportunities.If the team did not use the allocated resource, it would be lost and this seemed to be a waste of money and a lost opportunity for personal and professional development.

I compiled a short list of courses that I felt would be useful to members of my team and circulated them via email.As a result of this, two members of my team managed to secure places on a formal project management course which would feed into their roles, supervising various work streams that our team was working on.

One member has recently completed a project implementing a local prescribing formulary for primary and secondary care and the execution of the project, including the deliverables have definitely benefited from the additional training he has undergone. The project was finished on time, within budget and presented exceptionally well to our stakeholders. By contributing to the education, training and development of the team I have demonstrated how I have met the standard “effective leadership”.

When I noticed that we hadn’t utilised our training resource for this year, I was initially concerned that we might lose this and the impact it would have upon next year’s allocation.I was also slightly frustrated with my team for not prioritising this within their work to ensure that they continue to develop professionally and personally. However, I can understand that this would fall to the bottom of their list as they are all so busy with their day jobs that it can often be difficult to find the time to prioritise such matters.

(Why did it happen?)

As mentioned, it can often be difficult for team members to find the time and headspace to think about their own personal development, whilst trying to deliver on projects that they are responsible for. It is also difficult for some members of my team to see the value in attending additional training courses unless they can see a tangible benefit to their work.Both of these could have contributed to the fund not being used.

Additionally, I may have struggled to focus on supporting others with their learning as it has slipped as an organisational priority, again due to external pressures and workload.Therefore, I have not been as proactive in supporting others as I should have been.

(Could you have done anything differently?)

I think that I could’ve been more proactive in my approach with my team and identified clear learning opportunities with them at the start of the year. I could have also paid more attention to their development as the year went on, rather than being prompted by the financial agenda. Furthermore, rather than just sending an email to the team with some suggested courses, I could have met with them individually and understood their training needs in greater detail, so I could have tailored my suggestions for additional training, to best suit their needs.

(What will you do differently in the future?)

Going forward, I will ensure that I meet early on with my team members to discuss their identified learning and developmental goals. I will do this shortly after they have met with their line managers, for their yearly reviews. This will enable me to work with them, throughout the year, to help achieve their goals.I will also have a mid-year meeting with them to see how they are progressing and use that opportunity to support them to identify any opportunities they wish to pursue.

Effective Leadership: Non-Patient Facing Primary Care (RPS) Effective Leadership: Non-Patient Facing Primary Care (RPS)

Provide a reflective account of how you met one (or more) of the GPhC’s standards for pharmacy professionals.The GPhC will tell you which standard(s) to choose from each year.

I am a pharmacist working in a Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), which oversees the implementation of local prescribing formularies in line with my STP footprint.I am also the Education and Training lead for our CCG which means I champion the development of our 10 pharmacists.

My service users are the pharmacists within my project team and also the 10 pharmacists who rely on me for their Education and Training opportunities.

(Who, what, and why)

Part of my role is to ensure that the Education and Training budget for our team is appropriately managed. I will liaise with our team to identify their learning needs for the following 12 months and find learning opportunities that meet these needs.

It was approaching the end of our financial year and I could see that a number of our team had not organised any personal development opportunities.If the team did not use the allocated resource, it would be lost and this seemed to be a waste of money and a lost opportunity for personal and professional development.

I compiled a short list of courses that I felt would be useful to members of my team and circulated them via email.As a result of this, two members of my team managed to secure places on a formal project management course which would feed into their roles, supervising various work streams that our team was working on.

One member has recently completed a project implementing a local prescribing formulary for primary and secondary care and the execution of the project, including the deliverables have definitely benefited from the additional training he has undergone. The project was finished on time, within budget and presented exceptionally well to our stakeholders. By contributing to the education, training and development of the team I have demonstrated how I have met the standard “effective leadership”.

When I noticed that we hadn’t utilised our training resource for this year, I was initially concerned that we might lose this and the impact it would have upon next year’s allocation.I was also slightly frustrated with my team for not prioritising this within their work to ensure that they continue to develop professionally and personally. However, I can understand that this would fall to the bottom of their list as they are all so busy with their day jobs that it can often be difficult to find the time to prioritise such matters.

(Why did it happen?)

As mentioned, it can often be difficult for team members to find the time and headspace to think about their own personal development, whilst trying to deliver on projects that they are responsible for. It is also difficult for some members of my team to see the value in attending additional training courses unless they can see a tangible benefit to their work.Both of these could have contributed to the fund not being used.

Additionally, I may have struggled to focus on supporting others with their learning as it has slipped as an organisational priority, again due to external pressures and workload.Therefore, I have not been as proactive in supporting others as I should have been.

(Could you have done anything differently?)

I think that I could’ve been more proactive in my approach with my team and identified clear learning opportunities with them at the start of the year. I could have also paid more attention to their development as the year went on, rather than being prompted by the financial agenda. Furthermore, rather than just sending an email to the team with some suggested courses, I could have met with them individually and understood their training needs in greater detail, so I could have tailored my suggestions for additional training, to best suit their needs.

(What will you do differently in the future?)

Going forward, I will ensure that I meet early on with my team members to discuss their identified learning and developmental goals. I will do this shortly after they have met with their line managers, for their yearly reviews. This will enable me to work with them, throughout the year, to help achieve their goals.I will also have a mid-year meeting with them to see how they are progressing and use that opportunity to support them to identify any opportunities they wish to pursue.

Questions? Our dedicated Revalidation Support Service is here to help

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