Our gender and ethnicity pay gaps

  1. RPS pay gap by gender
  2. RPS pay gap by ethnicity

June 2020: RPS gender pay gap

Over the past two years RPS have been measuring our gender pay gap and reporting on a voluntary basis in accordance with the same criteria used by larger organisations that are legally obliged to report this.

21 Integrationhealthcareteam

We began publishing our figures in April 2019, with data from the previous year. With our 2020 figures now being published, we can look for patterns over time to see how we’ve progressed and to gain a fuller understanding of what actions are effective in addressing our pay gap.

Our minimum aspiration is that our pay gap is below the national average, which itself is decreasing over time. We’ve achieved this consistently by at least two to three percentage points since we started reporting. 

However, our median pay gap has increased over the last two years and that’s a cause for concern.

We know that some of this fluctuation stems from the small number of men employed at RPS – 77 of 209 employees - so that even one male appointment at senior level could affect male median pay by one or two percent. 

However, we’re not satisfied with the current position and are committed to improving it.

In our 2019 and 2020 pay reviews we used external pay benchmarking to uplift salaries that were assessed as below a reasonable market range. Although this was initially a gender neutral exercise it’s had a positive impact on the female/male pay ratios. 

We’re happy that we’ve reduced the over-representation of women in the lowest pay quartile from 12.3 to 2.2 % over the last two years and we’re committed to continuing that progress.

Action to address the pay gap

We recognise that there are many complex factors that contribute to the gender pay gap, including external labour market factors that we can’t influence directly. We’re working on a range of actions to improve women’s pay position over time.

One thing we’ve started doing is using a gender decoding tool to check that the language we’re using in job adverts is gender neutral and doesn’t discourage women from applying for senior roles or for roles in any areas of the organisation where they may be under-represented. This applies in the same way to more junior roles in the organisation where men are under-represented, so that we achieve a more even gender balance at all levels.

We’ll also be reviewing our recruitment processes more broadly to ensure that we’ve done everything we can to be fair and inclusive, to eliminate any potential bias across all our recruitment and to encourage greater representation of women in more highly paid roles.

We’ll continue to use pay benchmarking to ensure we address any low pay issues or salary disparities.

We’ll be working on our more detailed action plans in the course of this year with the involvement and support of our Inclusion and Diversity Group, the Employee Forum and colleagues across RPS.

Breakdown of RPS gender pay gap at 5 April 2020

The charts below show the breakdown of our pay gap and proportions of female/male representation at all levels within RPS.

To interpret the figures below, it’s important to remember that we are not dealing with large numbers of employees so percentages can be misleading. We have 209 employees in total, 132 are female and 77 are male. One man represents 1.3% of our total male population.

All charts below should be looked at considering the percentage representation of each employee group in the whole organisation. We employ approximately 63% women and 37% men. 

If both groups reached the top salary levels in the same proportions, we could expect to see about six women and four men in our top ten posts.

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% Breakdown of RPS employees (‘expected percentage’ for measuring gaps)

Employee group

Percentage of workforce

Number of employees

Female

63.2

132

Male

36.8

77



RPS gender pay gap 2020


Males

Females

% Gap
April 2020*

% Gap
April 2019*

% Gap
April 2018*

Median hourly rate

25.82

22.02

14.7

13.1

0.5

Mean hourly rate

29.01

24.24

16.4

19.1

14.8

Median bonus pay in 12-month period £

1000

400

60.0

33.3

0.0

Mean bonus pay in 12-month period £

6907

2941

57.4

50.9

35.0

Proportion of employees in each pay quartile






Upper quartile

50.9

49.1

-14.1

-18.0

-16.9

Upper middle quartile

38.5

61.5

-1.7

-0.8

4.8

Lower middle quartile

23.1

76.9

13.7

13.8

4.2

Lower quartile

34.6

65.4

2.2

5.2

12.3

Mean pay rate is the average of all salaries added together and divided by the total number of employees of that gender. 

Median pay rate is the middle salary in a range of individual salaries. Government measures use the median.

% difference for pay shows the difference from the expected percentage of employees in that quartile, based on 36.8% male and 63.2% female employees in the whole RPS workforce on the snapshot date of 5 April 2020.

The RPS median gender pay gap at April 2020 is 14.7% and therefore below the UK average. The UK average difference of median hourly rates is currently 17.3% 1


1 Last update from ONS 29 October 2019

June 2020: RPS ethnicity pay gap

Since 2018 RPS have been measuring our gender pay gap and reporting on a voluntary basis in accordance with the same criteria used by larger organisations that are legally obliged to report this. In 2020 we are reporting on our white/ethnic minority pay gap for the first time.

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At the same time, we have measured the ethnic diversity of our employees at different levels in the organisation. While we employ people from many professional disciplines, we are the pharmacy leadership body and it is only right that we compare ourselves to the profession we support.

Our findings are that the composition of our workforce mirrors the UK pharmacist workforce on gender, but is under on Black and Asian Minority Ethnic (BAME) representation.

The median pay gap between our white and BAME employees is 11.7%.

There is no simple comparison between the RPS White/BAME pay gap and a national pay gap as there are differences between racial groups. 

The RPS gap is below the 21.7% White/BAME pay gap in London, where most of our employees are based.

This doesn’t mean we accept our current pay gap as a good position to be in. This is our first report and we’ll use it as a baseline as we take action to reduce our pay gap.

Action to address the pay gap

We’ll continue to monitor BAME pay and representation at all levels within RPS and work to improve this. This includes using pay benchmarking as part of our annual pay reviews.

We’ll be adding an ethnicity reporting category to our employee survey so we can check if the high levels of satisfaction and engagement our surveys display apply equally to all groups.

We will encourage a diverse range of mentors, particularly people who are from BAME backgrounds (also including people who are LGBTQ+ or who have a disability), to help our senior leaders develop new ways of thinking, understand the challenges our colleagues face and help expand their personal networks.

We’ll also be reviewing our recruitment processes to ensure that we’ve done everything we can to be fair and inclusive, to eliminate any potential bias across all our recruitment and particularly to improve representation of BAME employees at senior level within RPS.

We’ll be working on our more detailed action plans in the course of this year with the involvement and support of our Inclusion and Diversity Group, the Employee Forum and colleagues across RPS.

Breakdown of RPS ethnicity pay gap at 5 April 2020

The charts below show the breakdown of our pay gap and proportions of BAME representation at all levels within RPS. We’ll add to this information over time as we make progress in addressing inequalities.

To interpret the figures below, it’s important to remember that we are not dealing with large numbers of employees so percentages can be misleading. We have 209 employees in total, 201 with declared ethnicity. 58 employees have declared BAME ethnicities, so one person would count as 1.7% of that group.

All charts below should be looked at considering the percentage representation of each employee group in the organisation. With 71% white and 29% BAME employees, if both groups reached the top salary levels in the same proportions, we could expect to see about seven white and three BAME employees in our top ten posts.

% Breakdown of RPS employees by ethnicity (‘expected percentage’ for measuring gaps)

Employee group

Percentage of workforce

Number of employees

White - all

71.1

143

BAME

28.9

58


RPS White/BAME Pay Gap

White

BAME

% Gap
April 2020*

Median hourly rate

24.28

21.43

11.7

Mean hourly rate

27.46

22.84

17.0

Median bonus pay in 12-month period

5056

1083

78.6

Proportion of employees in each pay quartile

Upper quartile

88.2

12.0

-16.9

Upper middle quartile

68.0

32.0

3.1

Lower middle quartile

62.7

37.3

8.4

Lower quartile

65.3

34.7

5.8

* Mean pay rate is the average of all salaries added together and divided by the total number of employees of that gender. Median pay rate is the middle salary in a range of individual salaries. Government measures use the median.

% difference for pay quartiles shows the difference from the expected percentage of employees in that quartile, based on 71.9% white and 28.1% BAME employees in the whole RPS workforce on the snapshot date of 5 April 2020.